Psychiatric Medicine Associates Psychiatric Medicine Associates
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Christine Paprocki , Ph.D. Clinical Psychologist

Christine Paprocki

Ph.D. Clinical Psychologist

Dr. Christine Paprocki is a state licensed clinical psychologist specializing in evidence-based interventions for individuals and couples. She completed a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Chicago, post-baccalaureate studies and research at Columbia University, and received her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In 2014, she returned to her hometown of Seattle to complete a clinical internship and post-doctoral fellowship at the VA Puget Sound – Seattle Division, and joined Psychiatric Medicine Associates in 2016. Dr. Paprocki also provides international consultation to therapists within the National Health System of the United Kingdom in the delivery of Cognitive Behavioral Couple Therapy.

Individual Psychotherapy Expertise

Dr. Paprocki specializes in cognitive-behavioral and exposure-based interventions for anxiety and mood disorders:

-Behavioral Activation and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression
-Cognitive Processing Therapy and Prolonged Exposure for Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
-Exposure and Response Prevention for Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
-Exposure-based interventions and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Panic Disorder, Social Anxiety Disorder, Generalized Anxiety Disorder
-Supportive therapy for life transitions and interpersonal challenges (e.g., career transitions, relationship conflict, establishing effective work/life balance, developing a social support network, stress related to developmental milestones)

Couple Therapy Expertise

Dr. Paprocki also has advanced specialization in Cognitive Behavioral Couple Therapy, treating couples experiencing distress in their relationships as well as couples in which one or both partners are experiencing chronic health conditions or mental health issues. Common concerns include:

-Communication difficulties
-Repeated arguments about: finances, parenting, quality time together, work stress, dual-professional work/life balance conflicts, household responsibilities
-Feeling distant from one another
-Difficulties in sexual relationship
-Discovery or history of infidelity
-Approaching a developmental milestone together (i.e., premarital counseling, discussing having children, discussing retirement)
-One partner is experiencing a mental or physical health problem, and the couple would like to learn strategies for better supporting each other and managing symptoms together


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Medication Assisted Treatment, commonly referred to as MAT, is nothing new in the treatment of addiction, but has frequently been approached with trepidation by people in recovery and those treating them. Some of the history of this is...

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by: Christine Paprocki | Oct. 25, 2016

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